Pidurangala Rock Hiking

Sigiriya is offering something challenging to try: Pidurangala Rock




Pidurangala

Sri Lanka is well known for its beautiful landscapes everywhere around the island. Many of these treasures, however, are still hidden to tourists that they easily escaped by. 
We came to know about Pidurangala Rock thanks to an Italian couple we met in Dambulla who advised us to visit this place instead of Lion’s Rock while in Sigiriya. They, themselves have opted for Pidurangala for a matter of cost as the entrance fee for foreign tourists was Rs 500.00 (Sri Lankans don't pay) each for Pidurangala Rock and Rs 3900.00  (Rs 50.00 for Sri Lankans) for Lion's Rock. 



Pidurangala Rock
In Sigiriya we were staying in a hotel called Back Of Beyond Pidurangala, which was just 15 minutes’ walk from the Rock. We started hiking around 4 pm to catch the sunset from the top. It was in fact popular and famous among Sri Lankans, hiking the brother Rock (this is how they call it) during the sunset or sunrise in order to catch the most beautiful and colourful moment. The hike started at the entrance of a Buddhist temple located at the base of a small hill; We paid Rs.500.00 as a kind of donation fee, to pass through the Temple. Make sure to take a sarong with you, as you’ll need to cover your shoulders and knees when going through the temple area. We were wearing sleeveless shirt and we forgot to bring our sarongs but fortunately at the ticket office they had some available free of charge for those, like us, who weren’t dressed properly. It was a no fly zone for drones.

Pidurangala Rock

Pidurangala Rock

Pidurangala Rock

Just behind the temple there was a path leading upwards to the caves where the sleeping Buddha’s statue was located. Until that point the trail was perfectly manageable, but starting from that moment it began to be challenging a bit; could be very difficult for seniors. But if you are young, you could even feel fun climbing between rocks to reach the top. We highly recommend comfortable cloths, backpack and good shoes which was quite essential specially for the second part of the hike which started after the cave Temple. Only a real Sri Lankan can do it with slippers. I was with my sandals and at a certain point I had to hike barefoot. Don’t even forget to take some water with you; we bought a water bottle at the small shop by the entrance. There were monkeys on the way up, ignore them and don’t give them eye contact because they might jump at you if they feel observed too much. There were massive boulders blocking the way up the rock, we suggest you to climb with someone or to join the group on the way because you can help each other up and around the rocks. It took us a while to figure out how to climb them but we still reached the top in only about 30 minutes and once there the amazing view in front of us has literally kicked our eyes. Pidurangala Rock was not quite as tall as Lion’s Rock but beside of being very cheap, from the top it provided spectacular and impressive views of the surrounding areas.
Pidurangala Rock

Pidurangala Rock

Pidurangala Rock

Pidurangala Rock

Pidurangala Rock

Pidurangala Rock


We wished we could stay longer but sadly just after the sunset, before it could get completely dark, we had to come down to the temple and walk fast to our hotel which was yes, close to the rock but at that time could still be dangerous as the wild elephants started going around when the darkness came. A tuk-tuk back hotel would certainly have been a smarter idea. Totally it took us about 3 hours back and forth. Pidurangala Rock was in fact a great option in Sigiriya but in our opinion it is not an alternative to the Lion’s Rock because they are totally different from each other. One had a spectacular view and the other one had a great historical significance. Time and money permitting we highly recommend both of them because they both deserved a visit.

Pidurangala Rock







4 comments:

  1. I went to India in January, I really wanted to pop over to Sri Lanka! It looks like such a beautiful place :)

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  2. Nice photos. And looks like you enjoyed visiting the place.

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  3. This sounds amazing! We have been contemplating if we should travel here in the near future

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  4. A rope is now anchored through a stay at the highest point of the climb. A belayer, your climbing accomplice,continue reading this.. clutches the contrary end of the rope, controlling any plus or minus while keeping it rigid.

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